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Getting Rid Of Diesel And Petrol Cars In London

June 2, 2020

Getting Rid Of Diesel And Petrol Cars In London – Will It Solve London’s Pollution Crisis? 

Is getting rid of diesel and petrol cars in London really going to sort out the London pollution crisis? The Uk government’s new target of getting rid of diesel and petrol cars by 2035 may aid the London pollution crisis, but may not solve it in one swoop as claimed by Premier Boris Johnson. The truth is that many other steps need to be taken in order to solve London’s pollution crisis and it involves all Londoners. For instance, has the UK government forgotten about all of the boats on The River Thames?

Most of the boats and barges on the River Thames are powered by diesel. No plans seem to be in place to replace old boat engines. On an average day in London, many hundreds of watercraft meander up and down the River Thames. They take locals to their work or tourist to their destination. The river is packed with pleasure crafts of all sorts, and unless they are powered by oars, they contribute to the amount of pollution London has to deal with on a daily basis. Believe it or not, goods are even transported up and down the River Thames.

These are not the only points which need to be taken into considering. Currently, there are no plans for replacing aging rubbish trucks with new less polluting ones. Rubbish is perhaps one of the greatest pollution challenges that London faces. Every day thousands of tons of rubbish is produced by people living or visiting London. What can be done with all of the rubbish? At the moment, a lot of it ends up in landfills or is even exported. That means we just push the problem from pillar to post. 

In order to make London one of the first cities in the world carbon-neutral, we really need to revaluate what we are doing. Perhaps it is about time we took a look at what other countries such as Sweden are doing when it comes to dealing with pollution. For instance, did you know that almost 100% of all glass bottles in Sweden are recycled? Should we ditch Coca-cola cans for recyclable glass bottles? That would seem like a much better idea.

What about all of those takeaway coffee cups you find floating in Camden lock? If you have been down the Regents Canal recently you may have seen the extent of the program. From the back of the London zoo, you will encounter an endless amount of floating garbage. Eventually, it seems to drift down towards Camden lock where it is either “fished out” or drift on as the lock is open and closed by travellers on the canal. Just one of the problems that London faces on its way to becoming a carbon-neutral city.

Being a tourist in my old home “ town” was a real eye-opener for me. We traveled up The Thames from   Richmond and took the Regents Canal to explore this other side of London and bring back old memories. I can’t believe that I once used to row the Regents Canal with my friends and it was more or less a pollution-free zone. Turning London into a carbon-neutral city is certainly a challenge. We need to clean it up and get tree planting to at least give London and Londoners a chance to enjoy a pollution-free lifestyle.